Mara Louk says Visible Music College punished her after rape claim

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A woman claims her Christian college not only failed to protect her after she reported being choked and raped by a classmate last year — they punished her for coming forward, according to reports.

Mara Louk, 22, filed a federal complaint with the US Department of Education against Visible Music College in Memphis Wednesday.

The former student claims administrators wouldn’t remove her attacker from her classes, because he had not been arrested, court papers say.

Mara Louk claims her Christian college failed to protect her after she reported being choked and raped by a classmate last year.
Facebook/Mara Louk
Mara Louk
Mara Louk says Visible Music College punished her for coming forward about the alleged rapeist.
Mara Louk
Mara Louk wants the Department of Education to investigate Visible Music College.

They also accused Louk of breaking school rules forbidding premarital sex, with a different student — her ex-boyfriend, the suit claims. Although she denied the accusation, the school allegedly threatened to expel her unless she signed a confession and finished her school year remotely, according to an NBC News report.

“I just felt like, why did I even speak up?” Louk told the network. “That’s truly how I felt for a long time because everything seemed to keep getting worse.”

Louk wants the Department of Education to investigate Visible, to determine if the school violated a federal campus safety law requiring administrators to tell students of their options for help when they report sexual offenses.

Visible Music College
Visible Music College declined to comment.
Facebook/Visible Music College
Mara Louk
Louk wants the federal agency to determine whether the school discriminated against her under the gender-equity law Title IX.
Mara Louk
Mara Louk claims administrators wouldn’t remove her attacker from her classes, because he had not been arrested.
Facebook/Mara Louk

Louk also wants the federal agency to determine whether the school discriminated against her under the gender-equity law Title IX, which protects students from discrimination based on sex.

The college declined to comment last week. Ken Steorts, Visible’s president, said the school had not yet seen a copy of Louk’s complaint, but told NBC that “Visible will cooperate with any investigation of the allegations made in the complaint.”

Calls to Louk’s attorney were not returned Saturday.

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