Trump 'simply does not care' about HIV/AIDS, say 6 experts who just quit his advisory council – SFGate

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The first hints of an uncertain future for the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS came last year, when Donald Trump’s presidential campaign refused to meet with advocates for people living with HIV, said Scott Schoettes, a member of the council since 2014.

That unease was magnified on Inauguration Day in January, when an official White House website for the Office of National AIDS Policy vanished, Schoettes said.

“I started to think, was it going to be useful or wise or would it be possible to work with this administration?” Schoettes told The Washington Post. “Still, I made a decision to stick it out and see what we could do.”

Less than six months later, Schoettes said those initial reservations had given way to full-blown frustration over a lack of dialogue with or caring from Trump administration officials about issues relating to HIV or AIDS.

Last Tuesday, he and five others announced they were quitting Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS, also known as PACHA. According to Schoettes, the last straw – or “more like a two-by-four than a straw” – had come in May, after the Republican-dominated House of Representatives passed the American Health Care Act, which he said would have “devastating” effects on those living with HIV.


Photo: Evan Vucci, Associated Press

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President Donald Trump speaks at an event in Miami.

President Donald Trump speaks at an event in Miami.


Photo: Evan Vucci, Associated Press

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The first AIDS News story in The Chronicle ran on Saturday, June 6, 1981.

The first AIDS News story in The Chronicle ran on Saturday, June 6, 1981.


Photo: The Chronicle, 1981

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July 20th, 1987 – Dr. William Owan examines Fred Hoffman in his St. Louis Hospital room while Hoffman;s love Russ Fields sits on the bed providing moral support.

July 20th, 1987 – Dr. William Owan examines Fred Hoffman in his St. Louis Hospital room while Hoffman;s love Russ Fields sits on the bed providing moral support.


Photo: Tom Levy, The Chronicle

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The Chronicle story about AIDS on Tuesday, October 20, 1981 by Charles Petit, science correspondent.

The Chronicle story about AIDS on Tuesday, October 20, 1981 by Charles Petit, science correspondent.


Photo: The Chronicle, 1981

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The Chronicle AIDS story by Randy Shilts on May 13, 1982.

The Chronicle AIDS story by Randy Shilts on May 13, 1982.


Photo: The Chronicle, 1982

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The Chronicle AIDS story by Randy Shilts on May 13, 1982.

The Chronicle AIDS story by Randy Shilts on May 13, 1982.


Photo: The Chronicle, 1982

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The Chronicle AIDS story by Charles Petit on August 11, 1982.

The Chronicle AIDS story by Charles Petit on August 11, 1982.


Photo: The Chronicle, 1982

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The Chronicle AIDS story by Charles Petit on August 11, 1982.

The Chronicle AIDS story by Charles Petit on August 11, 1982.


Photo: The Chronicle, 1982

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The Chronicle package of stories about AIDS on October 12, 1982.

The Chronicle package of stories about AIDS on October 12, 1982.


Photo: The Chronicle, 1982

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The Chronicle package of stories about AIDS on October 12, 1982.

The Chronicle package of stories about AIDS on October 12, 1982.


Photo: The Chronicle, 1982

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December 9th, 1984 – Sandra Ford, a drug technician, holds Pentamidine Isethionate at Med Sci Drugs

December 9th, 1984 – Sandra Ford, a drug technician, holds Pentamidine Isethionate at Med Sci Drugs


Photo: Steve Ringman, The Chronicle

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July, 24th, 1987 – Knaus Fehing hands out cookies to AIDS volunteers at the Gay Men’s Health Crisis Center in New York.

July, 24th, 1987 – Knaus Fehing hands out cookies to AIDS volunteers at the Gay Men’s Health Crisis Center in New York.


Photo: Fred Larson, The Chronicle

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December 17th, 1987 – AIDS Memorial Quilt opening at the Moscone Center.

December 17th, 1987 – AIDS Memorial Quilt opening at the Moscone Center.


Photo: Fred Larson, The Chronicle

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August 31st, 1988 – Willie Otero, 17 years old, from the Bronx and Phyllis Sanchez with her two and a half year old daughter Jennifer, Both Willie and Phyllis have AIDS, and Jennifer has ARC.

August 31st, 1988 – Willie Otero, 17 years old, from the Bronx and Phyllis Sanchez with her two and a half year old daughter Jennifer, Both Willie and Phyllis have AIDS, and Jennifer has ARC.


Photo: Steve Ringman, The Chronicle

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January 15, 1989 – Judd Wozencraft, a man with AIDS attends Sunday morning Radiant Light Ministry Service at the Swedish American Hall in San Francisco.

January 15, 1989 – Judd Wozencraft, a man with AIDS attends Sunday morning Radiant Light Ministry Service at the Swedish American Hall in San Francisco.


Photo: Tom Levy, The Chronicle

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January 23rd, 1989 – Issan Dorsey, a Zen monk, presides over the Hartford Street Zen Center. He is HIV positive . He is a former drag queen and drug addict.

January 23rd, 1989 – Issan Dorsey, a Zen monk, presides over the Hartford Street Zen Center. He is HIV positive . He is a former drag queen and drug addict.


Photo: Tom Levy, The Chronicle

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January 26th, 1989 – UCSF AIDS Immunobiology Research Institute. Isabelle Gaston, research assistant working on blood isolation within the Bio Hazards Facility.

January 26th, 1989 – UCSF AIDS Immunobiology Research Institute. Isabelle Gaston, research assistant working on blood isolation within the Bio Hazards Facility.


Photo: Eric Luse, The Chronicle

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January 26th, 1989 – Aerosolized antibiotics pentamidine is given to an AIDS patient at UCSF.

January 26th, 1989 – Aerosolized antibiotics pentamidine is given to an AIDS patient at UCSF.


Photo: The Chronicle

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May 28th, 1989 – Two men embrace as the AIDS march goes by near the start at Market and 18th.

May 28th, 1989 – Two men embrace as the AIDS march goes by near the start at Market and 18th.


Photo: Scott Sommerdorf, The Chronicle

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June 9th, 1989 – Kairos House, a place whwere burnt out AIDS works/volunteers go for support and help and socializing.

June 9th, 1989 – Kairos House, a place whwere burnt out AIDS works/volunteers go for support and help and socializing.


Photo: Deanne Fitzmaurice, The Chronicle

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May 12th, 1989 – Kimiko Sakuma, an 8-year-old in the 3rd grade holds her panel that she made for the Children’s Quilt Project – quilts that are made to educate kids about AIDS.

May 12th, 1989 – Kimiko Sakuma, an 8-year-old in the 3rd grade holds her panel that she made for the Children’s Quilt Project – quilts that are made to educate kids about AIDS.


Photo: Steve Ringman, The Chronicle

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August 15th, 1989 – ACT-UP group demonstrated in the Sonoma County Supervisors chambers, chasing them out, stopping business for the day. Late in the afternoon, 10 were arrested and taken away. The group threw red confetti around the office to illustrate blood on the hands of the Supervisors’ hands for not allotting more money for AIDS programs. less
August 15th, 1989 – ACT-UP group demonstrated in the Sonoma County Supervisors chambers, chasing them out, stopping business for the day. Late in the afternoon, 10 were arrested and taken away. The group threw … more


Photo: Fred Larson, The Chronicle

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September 14th, 1989 – Demonstrators from ACT-UP chanted slogans (including “We’re here, we’re queer, we’re not selling stocks”) outside the pacific Stock Exchange. They were protesting Burroughs-Wellcome making profits from the drug, AZT. less
September 14th, 1989 – Demonstrators from ACT-UP chanted slogans (including “We’re here, we’re queer, we’re not selling stocks”) outside the pacific Stock Exchange. They were protesting Burroughs-Wellcome … more


Photo: Scott Sommerdorf, The Chronicle

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September 18th, 1990 – Protesters were laying down on Powell Street after the police just told them to leave or be arrested – they were immediately taken away and arrested.

September 18th, 1990 – Protesters were laying down on Powell Street after the police just told them to leave or be arrested – they were immediately taken away and arrested.


Photo: Steve Ringman, The Chronicle

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October 13th, 1992 – Jose Manual Jimenez, left, lost his partner Manual Perez to AIDS and has never has never had a test himself. He is in his Tenderloin hotel room with a sick friend who is going to the hospital with AIDS-like symptoms. less
October 13th, 1992 – Jose Manual Jimenez, left, lost his partner Manual Perez to AIDS and has never has never had a test himself. He is in his Tenderloin hotel room with a sick friend who is going to the … more


Photo: Brant Ward, The Chronicle

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Trump ‘simply does not care’ about HIV/AIDS, say 6 experts who just quit his advisory council

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“The Trump Administration has no strategy to address the on-going HIV/AIDS epidemic, seeks zero input from experts to formulate HIV policy, and – most concerning – pushes legislation that will harm people living with HIV and halt or reverse important gains made in the fight against this disease,” Schoettes wrote in a blistering guest column for Newsweek announcing the resignations.

The column also pointed out that Trump has still not appointed anyone to head the White House Office of National AIDS Policy, which former president Barack Obama had done 36 days after his own inauguration.

“Within 18 months, that new director and his staff crafted the first comprehensive U.S. HIV/AIDS strategy. By contrast, President Trump appears to have no plan at all,” Schoettes wrote. “Public health is not a partisan issue … If the President is not going to engage on the subject of HIV/AIDS, he should at least continue policies that support people living with and at higher risk for HIV and have begun to curtail the epidemic.”

The column was co-signed by the five other members of the council who had resigned, including Lucy Bradley-Springer, Gina Brown, Ulysses W. Burley III, Grissel Granados and Michelle Ogle. As of Monday morning, their bios remained on PACHA’s government website.

Neither the White House nor the Department of Health and Human Services responded immediately to requests for comment Monday morning. An unnamed White House source told BuzzFeed News that staff members from the domestic policy council had “met with HIV/AIDS representatives several times.”

“I challenge them to identify those times and the people that they met with those times because I’m unaware of those meetings, certainly at a high level,” Schoettes told The Post. “This administration has shown themselves to be anti-science in multiple areas. I don’t know how we can argue policy positions if they don’t use facts.”

PACHA was founded in 1995 under the Department of Health and Human Services to advise the White House on policy matters concerning the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Members are appointed by the Secretary of Health and Human Services for four-year terms; they are not paid and are based throughout the country. Over the last two decades, its members have included physicians, public health specialists, attorneys, healthcare executives and community organizers.

Though there can be up to 25 members on the council, a handful of existing vacancies meant there were only 21 on the board before the mass resignations. Now only 15 remain.

Schoettes said that council’s last in-person meeting was in March, where it continued drafting policy recommendations, knowing that a repeal of Obamacare was among Trump’s top priorities.

“We knew that health-care reform was pending or was likely and we wanted to make sure that our voices and the voices of people with HIV were heard,” he said.

Shortly after that meeting, the council sent a letter to Tom Price, the Trump-appointed secretary of Health and Human Services, and received what Schoettes described as a “perfunctory” response.

The House’s passage of the American Health Care Act in May, despite their pleas and research, was what finally made Schoettes realize the council could be rendered inconsequential under Trump. He explained in his resignation column in Newsweek the consequences that a repeal of the Affordable Care Act could have for people living with HIV:

“People living with HIV know how broken the pre-ACA system was. Those without employer-based insurance were priced out of the market because of pre-existing condition exclusions. And ‘high risk pools’ simply segregated people living with HIV and other health conditions into expensive plans with inferior coverage and underfunded subsidies – subsidies advocates had to fight for tooth-and-nail in every budgetary session.

“Because more than 40 percent of people with HIV receive care through Medicaid, proposed cuts to that program would be extremely harmful. Prior to Medicaid expansion under ACA, a person had to be both very low income and disabled to be eligible for Medicaid.

“For people living with HIV, that usually meant an AIDS diagnosis – making the disease more difficult and expensive to bring under control – before becoming eligible.”

Shortly after the bill’s passage in the House, Schoettes fired off an email to several of his council colleagues. He planned to resign, he announced, because the council was “not going to be able to be effective anymore.” Five of his colleagues agreed.

“As advocates for people living with HIV, we have dedicated our lives to combating this disease and no longer feel we can do so effectively within the confines of an advisory body to a president who simply does not care,” Schoettes wrote. “We hope the members of Congress who have the power to affect healthcare reform will engage with us and other advocates in a way that the Trump Administration apparently will not.”

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